Tibet, White Tara (8)

15th century, Tibet, Tsang province, metal (copper alloy), at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York (USA).White Tara’s thin waist, silk shawl and festooned necklace denote a Chinese influence, while her facial features and the absence of gilding are typical of Tibetan works. She holds the stem of a blue lotus in her left hand (doing the gesture to bestow refuge) and has an open lotus next to her right shoulder.

Undated, Tibet, Tara, gilt metal with silver inlay, private collection, photo on Himalayan Art Resources

A rare sculpture of White Tara with an effigy of Amitabha on her chignon, the  three eyes on her face inlaid with silver. She is seated on a lotus base with thick beading at the bottom but none at the top.

16th century, Tibet, Tara, silver with stone inlay, private collection, photo by Christie’s.

The turquoise-inlaid protuberance on her forehead looks more like an urna (orginially a lock of hair on the forehead of the historical buddh) than a third eye (which is always vertical and narrow), in which case we would be looking at Vishvamata.

17th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt bronze (copper alloy) with stone inlay, at the Royal Ontario Museum (Canada).

We saw a Green Tara from the same museum, adorned with similar accessories with very intricate details (thanks to the repoussé technique), reminiscent of some Mongolian works.

Undated, Tibet, Tara (copper alloy), private collection, photo on Himalayan Art Resources, item 59525.

A brass sculpture with Kashmiri features such as the cruciform navel and the inverted U-shaped hem of her bodice, Western Tibetan elements such as the five-point crown with triangular panels  and the plump oval face associated with Guge but without silver inlay for the eyes, together with a silk shawl forming loops at elbow level, an ample lower garment folded loosely over the legs, plain jewellery, an elongated torso and a thin waist suggesting a Chinese influence. The third eye on her face is barely incised above her unibrow.

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Tibet, Green Tara (21)

13th century, Tibet, Tara, bronze, private collection, photo by Hardt Auctions.

A dark bronze of Green Tara similar in style to a 13th-14th century figure we saw in a previous post, with the same hair ornament, jewellery and lotus base (see below for reminder).

13th-14th century, Western Tibet, Tara.

13th-14th century, Tibet, Tara, metal (brass), at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York (USA).

A Pala-style sculpture of Tara with a voluminous hairdo and a long garment that fans out over the lotus base (compare with this post ).

13th-14th century (labelled 17th century on HAR), gilt bronze, private collection, photo by Christie’s, sale 17347.

A gilt (and seemingly later) version with Chinese-style facial features, heavier and less detailed accessories and lotuses, but a similar treatment of the garment.

15th century, Tibet, Tara, silver with stone inlay on a gilt metal base, at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York (USA).

15th-16th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt bronze (copper alloy) with stone inlay, private collection, photo by Nagel, sale 736 China 3.

16th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt bronze, private collection, photo by Christie’s, sale 17347.

 

Tibet, Tara – variants (2)

14th century, Tibet, Tara, brass, private collection, photo by Marie-Catherine Daffos on aaoartsA rich copper alloy sculpture of White Tara, seated with her legs locked, a third eye on her forehead and an eye incised in the palm of her hands and the sole of her feet, a sash drawn across her breast. She holds the stem of a lotus in her left hand while doing a refuge-bestowing gesture, and displays supreme generosity with the other. A blue lotus rises from the base to her right.

15th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt bronze (copper alloy), lotus not original, private collection, photo by Nagel, sale 736, China 3.

Circa 18th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt bronze (copper alloy), photo by Marie-Catherine Daffos for aaoarts.

17th century, Tibet, Tara (labelled “Amitayus”), private collection, photo on  Cambiaste

17th century, Tibet, Tara, soapstone, private collection, photo by Christie’s, sale 17347.This Tara wears bulky jewellery including some ‘shin ornaments’ on top of her lower garment.

17th-18th century, Tibet, Tara, bronze (copper alloy), private collection, photo by photo by Nagel.

The missing hair ornament on this Pala-revival work reveals a cascade of curls on each side of her head.Note the huge floral earrings.

17th century, Tibet, Tara, bronze (brass), private collection, photo by Christie’s, sale 17347.

18th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt bronze (copper alloy), private collection, photo by Nagel, sale 101 China 2.A curious figure holding the stem of lotuses topped with a book and a conch shell.

15th century, Central Tibet, gilt bronze with turquoise and coral inlay, private collection, photo by Hollywood Galleries .

Tara with four heads, each one with a third eye, and eight hands. From top to bottom she holds a sword and a lotus, a bow and an arrow, a wheel and another object, a vajra sceptre and a noose.

Tibet, Green Tara (20)

12th c., Tibet, Tara, brass+sil.+cop.+turq., 30 cm, tenzingasianart.com

12th century, Tibet, Tara, brass with silver, copper and turquoise inlay, private collection, photo on Tenzing Asian Art

This unusual Indo-Tibetan work depicts Green Tara with her hair coiled and adorned with a small tiara. Her eyes are inlaid with silver, her lips with copper, her sash and lower garment have a stippled lotus pattern, a lotus is embossed in the palm of her right hand, held out in the gesture of supreme generosity.

14th century, Tibet, Tara, bronze (brass), private collection, photo on Christie’s

14th century or later, Tibet, Tara, bronze (copper alloy), private collection, photo on Koller

16th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt bronze with stone inlay, private collection, photo on Bonhams

16th century, Tibet, Tara (labelled Prajnaparamita), gilt bronze, private collection, photo on Casa Cambi d’Aste

16th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt bronze with stone inlay, private collection, photo by Nagel.

A rare sculpture of Green Tara holding a lotus inlaid with lapis lazuli and a red stone or coral at the centre.

16th century, Tibet, Tara, copper alloy with traces of gilding, private collection, photo on Armand Antiques

This Tara wears a sumptuous garment decorated with a floral print prolonged on the upper part of the single lotus base.

18th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt bronze with stone inlay, private collection, photo by Pierre Bergé & Associés, http://www.pba-auctions.com.

 

Tibet, Green Tara (19)

Circa 14th century, Tibet, Tara, copper alloy with cold gold, private collection, photo by Fabrice Gousset on aaoarts

A singular Tara with slanted eyes and unibrow, her face painted with cold gold, her right foot on an open flower fastened to the rim of the lotus base, the hem of her ankle-length garment and the ribbon of her crown decorated with a chased geometrical pattern, the stem of a (broken) lotus in her left hand.

14th-15th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt copper with stone inlay, private collection, photo by Koller .

Most early Nepalese works are made of copper rather than copper alloy, and it was the Newars who introduced fire gilding and stone inlay techniques to Tibet. They preferred clear gems while Tibetan patrons favoured hard stones such as turquoise and lapis lazuli, and coral. Both lotuses here are of the blue variety. The hem of her lower garment is decorated with a chased geometrical pattern, she is adorned with Nepalese-style jewellery including shin ornaments.

Circa 16th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt bronze (copper alloy) with glass inlay, photo by Marie-Catherine Daffos for aaoarts as before.

A similar work, with an incised motif on the plinth of the lotus base.

15th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt copper alloy with stone inlay, private collection, photo by Bonhams.

15th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt copper alloy with turquoise and lapis lazuli, private collection, photo by Bonhams.

Green Tara’s right hand often displays the gesture of supreme generosity while the other does a gesture to bestow refuge or to ward off evil. She may have two open lotuses, or a day lotus to her right and a night/blue lotus to her left…

Circa 16th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt bronze (copper alloy) with turquoise, photo by Marie-Catherine Daffos on aaoarts

… or vice-versa in this case.

16th-17th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt copper, private collection, photo by Kollerhttp://www.kollerauktionen.ch .

17th century, Tibet, Tara (labelled Padmapani), bronze with copper inlay, private collection, photo by Polyauction

The heart-shaped petals on this tall lotus base are typical of the Pala-revival style. She does a gesture to dispel fear and displays a lotus embossed in the palm of her hand.

17th-18th c., Tibet, Tara, polychrome wood, 14,3 cm, Lempertz

17th-18th century, Tibet, Tara, polychrome wood, private collection, photo on Lempertz

18th century, Tara, Tibet, gilt bronze (copper alloy) with cold gold and pigments, private collection, photo on Nagel

Tibet, Green Tara (18)

16th-17th c., Tibet, Tara green, gilt bronze+turq., 19 cm, Sotheby's

16th-17th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt bronze (copper alloy) with turquoise, private collection, photo by Sotheby’s.

Green Tara, with a blue lotus to her left and an open lotus on the other side and under her right foot, her hands doing the usual gestures to show generosity and give refuge, her tall Pala-style Chignon topped with a flaming jewel, all her accessories inlaid with turquoise at the front and at the back (see next photo).

16th-17th c., Tibet, Tara green, gilt bronze+turq., 19 cm, rear petals but one, Sotheby's

 

The petals on the lotus base go all the way round yet the central ones appear to be purposely unfinished.

15th-16th century, (Tibet), Tara, gilt bronze with stones, private collection, photo by Polyauction

A similar style, with a carefully chased geometrical pattern adorning her garment.

16th century, Tibet, Tara, copper alloy, private collection, photo on Dragon’s Pearl

She may do the fear-allaying gesture with her left hand, as above.

17th century, Tibet, Tara, bronze (copper alloy), private collection, photo by Christie’s.

A Pala revival sculpture of Tara with traces of cold gold on her face, her long garment carefully pleated on one side.

18th c., Tibet, Tara, parcel gilt bronze, 10,8 cm, Paris Sotheby's

18th century, Tibet, Tara, bronze (copper alloy) with cold gold, private collection, photo by Sotheby’s.

 

Tibet, Green Tara (17)

Circa 11th-12th century, Western Tibet or Kashmir, Tara, bronze (brass), private collection, photo by Nagel .

The Indian Pala style is predominant in this brass figure, especially in the treatment of the eyes, the punched navel, the beaded hair ornament and the long garment whose folds occupy most of the seat. Her right hand does a fear-allaying gesture, the other holds the stem of a large lotus flower.

15th century, Central Tibet, Tsang province, Tara, bronze (gilt copper alloy with cold gold and pigments), at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York (USA) https://www.himalayanart.org/items/700026.

Green Tara often holds her right hand in the gesture of supreme generosity while the tip of the ring finger presses the tip of the thumb on her left hand, to bestow refuge. The above wears a celestial scarf and lower garment with stippled lotuses.

15th-16th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt bronze (copper alloy) with turquoise and clear stones, private collection, photo by Bonhams https://www.bonhams.com.

Her right foot usually rests on a lotus that stems from the base, as on this figure with harmonious proportions, whose jewellery is inlaid with a profusion of medium-size cabochons, a feature typical of gilt works attributed to 15th century Tibet.

16th century, Tibet, Tara, gilt bronze, private collection, photo by Kapoor Galleries https://www.kapoorgalleries.com.

A rare example with the left foot on the lotus fastened to the base, her right hand doing a gesture to express knowledge (palm upwards, tip of thumb pressing tip of forefinger), the other bestowing patience (tip of middle finger pressing tip of thumb).

17th century, Tibet, Tara, bronze (copper alloy) with turquoise, private collection, photo by Nagel https://www.auction.de.

17th-18th century, Tibet, Tara, bronze (copper alloy) with traces of cold gold and pigment, private collection, photo by Nagel https://www.auction.de.