Kunga Gyaltsen (3)

Undated, Tibet, Kunga Gyaltsen, bronze (brass) with silver and copper inlay, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

We saw recently a 15th century Tibetan sculpture of another teacher (Lhatsun Choje) seated on a similar type of stepped throne with lions and elephants and a row of thick beading at the bottom. On this occasion, the lions are in the corner and there are two kneeling figures at the centre instead of one.

Kunga Gyaltsen, otherwise known as Sakya Pandita, wears the Sakya hat with long flaps over the ears, an outer garment incised all over with a floral pattern, a vest with a floral border made of silver and copper inlay. He also  has silver-inlaid eyes and copper-inlaid lips. The hands do the ‘turning the wheel of dharma gesture’ and hold the stem of lotuses that support the hilt of a sword and a manuscript.

Same as before (15th-16th century ?).

Without his bonnet, the eyes inlaid with silver and the lips with copper, the hem of his garments incised with a floral motif, a letter incised on this robe.

17th-18th century, Tibet, probably Kunga Gyaltsen, gilt bronze (copper alloy), published on http://www.liveauctioneers.com.

Sculptures of deified lamas wearing a Sakya hat are numerous, and we would need to know the contents of  the inscription on the rim of the base  to positively identify him.

Undated, Tibet, Kunga Gyaltsen, (gilt copper or copper alloy), published on Himalayan Art Resources.

 

Tibet, Sonam Lhundrup (2)

16th century, Tibet, Sonam Lhundrup, copper alloy, private collection, photo by Bonhams.

One of a series of portraits of this master framed by lotuses that support a manuscript and the hilt of a sword. His left hand is in the meditation gesture and may have held an attribute, the right hand does the teaching gesture. An inscription on the rim of the base gives us his name and that of the patron, Sonam Pelzang.

Same as before.

Seated on a single lotus base, Lowo Khenchen Sonam Lhundrup holds a flaming jewel in his left hand.

16th century, Tibet, Sonam Lhundrup, copper alloy, private collection, photo by Bonhams.

Seated on a double lotus base, same iconography (the forefinger on the right hand appears to be broken), the facial features less life-like.

15th-16th century, Tibet, Sonam Lhundrup, copper alloy with silver and copper inlay, from the Ngor monastery, published on http://www.Hayman-Himalayan-Art.hk

He is wearing the Sakya bonnet and the border on his vest and robe is incised with a large floral motif. The eyes are inlaid with silver and the lips with copper.

 

Tibet, Shangton Chobar

15th-16th century, Tibet, Shangton Chobar, copper alloy, with silver inlay, private collection, photo by Bonhams.

Shangton Chobar (( Zhang province, 1053),  identified through an inscription on the rim of the lotus base, is depicted in full monastic attire, holding a flaming jewel in his left hand, the other doing the teaching gesture.

16th century, same as before.

He is sometimes portrayed with a bare chest, probably because was a layman, not a monk, although he studied and taught the Lamdre tradition.

See full biographical notes on http://www.himalayanart.org/search/set.cfm?setID=2139 or on http://www.treasuryoflives.org/biographies/view/Zhangton-Chobar/7024

(both texts are identical)

Tibet, Marpa Chokyi Lodro (2)

16th century, Tibet, Marpa Chokyi Lodro, brass, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

When portrayed as an old man, this famous 11th century Tibetan teacher and translator is usually depicted in full monastic attire, seated in a relaxed manner, his hands over his knees.

His gown and meditation cloak are decorated with large circular motifs.

15th century circa, Tibet, Marpa Chokyi Lodro, gilt copper, is or was at the Jokhang, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

This is quite a different portrait of a younger Marpa, identified through an inscription at the back of the lotus base, his face painted with cold gold and pigments, his long black hair combed back, his hands in the ‘turning the wheel of dharma’ gesture.

16th-17th century, Tibet, Lama (probably Marpa Chokyi Lodro), copper alloy, private collection, photo by Nagel.

Although there is no inscription to identify him, this lama with a square jaw, droopy eyes and thick matted hair is almost certainly Marpa, seated on a couple of cushions covered with a blanket.

Undated (17th century?), Tibet, Marpa Chokyi Lodro, gilt metal, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

This sculpture is very similar to another on display at the Met, previously labelled ‘early 12th century” and now labelled ’17th century’, published in a former post and reproduced below for comparison. We will see that the belt only has three layers arranged horizontally, and that the fingers are thicker and held apart. Also, the folds of the gown are rounder and make the fabric look softer.

17th century, Tibet, Marpa, bronze with copper, silver and gold inlay, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (USA).

17th century or later, Tibet, Marpa Chokyi Lodro, rhinoceros horn, at the Rumtek monastery in Sikkim, photo by Nik Douglas.

Another portrait of a young Marpa with long hair, holding a rosary with both hands.

18th century, Tibet, Marpa Chokyi Lodro, gilt copper alloy, private collection, photo by Bonhams.

Bonhams tell us that this is one of a series of five portraits of the master. It is extraordinarily life-like and very similar to the 16th century item at the top of this page but only has one cushion and no inlay on his garments.

 

Tibet, various lamas (6)

15th century, Central Tibet, Tsang, Sangye Pel, copper alloy with silver inlay, private collection, photo by Bonhams.

This master, also known as Buddhashri and identified though an inscription on the base, was closely related to the Ngor monastery, where he taught several of the abbots. In this deified portrait, he holds the stem of lotuses that support a book and the hilt of a sword.

His patched garments and bonnet are incised in a skilful manner typical of the Tsang atelier.

16th century, Tibet, Sangye Pel, copper alloy, private collection, photo by Sotheby’s.

Here he is framed by two lotuses, one of them topped with a vajra-handled bell (ghanta).

14th-15th centuyr, Tibet, Sengge Gyaltsen, copper alloy, private collection, photo by Bonhams.

This lama, with both hands in the meditation gesture, has a kind of medallion at the front of his vest and wears a pointed cap which contributes to the pyramidal aspect of the sculpture.

His meditation coat is beautifully incised throughout-

Same as before.

He looks somewhat older here but wears the same type of vest with an effigy of a lama at the front.

 

Tibet, various lamas (5)

16th century, Tibet, Khyung.po’l.Zabs, copper alloy with silver inlay, private collection, photo by Christie’s.

This lama, who appears to have no vest, wears a Sakya hat incised with a rice grain motif and a robe with an incised floral pattern on the border. There is a diamond engraved in the palm of his hand, his eyes are inlaid with silver.

He does the teaching gesture with his right hand, the other is held in meditation and may have sustained a manuscript.

Same, Samsmedyon Dramchon, same as before.

This one holds a flaming jewel in his left hand and a pearl between the right thumb and forefinger (it could also be a pill but the other attribute would then be a medicine bowl).

His eyes are inlaid with silver, a lotus inside a diamond is engraved in the palm of his right hand. He wears the full monastic garments, the hem decorated with various floral motifs.

15th century, Tibet, Sangye Chospa, silver, at the Sangphu Monastery, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

An interesting combination of patched vest and plain pleated robe, the latter worn in the Indian fashion, both with thick beading on the edge, the undergarment pleated under the breast. An inscription on the base tells us that this image was made for the chief abbot of the monastery, Choje Sherab palden zangpo, which situates it in the mid 1470s.

18th century, Tibet, Rolpai Dorje, gilt copper alloy, private collection, published on http://www.buddhistart.com

Changkya Rolpai Dorje, from Changkya, Kham, Eastern Tibet, became an important translator and teacher at the (Chinese) Qing court during the 18th century. He is depicted seated on three embroidered cushions covered with a blanket (a feature which normally indicates that the sculpture was made during his lifetime), wrapped in fine monastic garments and framed by two open lotuses.

 

 

Tibet, Kunga Gyaltsen (2)

15th century, Tibet, Sakya Pandita, gilt copper alloy and lapis lazuli, private collection, photo by Christie’s.

On this portrait of a young Kunga Gyaltsen, otherwise known as ‘Sakya pandita’,  the small bar of lapis lazuli inlaid in the manuscript supported by the lotus to his left is a noticeable and singular feature.

15th-16th century, Tibet, Kunga Gyaltsen, copper alloy, private collection, photo by Sotheby’s.

This masterpiece depicts him older, his eyes and beard inlaid with silver. He is framed by lotuses supporting a book topped with a pearl and the hilt of a flaming sword, the hem of his garments are decorated with a chased floral pattern and his (rather oversized) hat incised with notches.

16th century, Tibet, Kunga Gyaltsen, copper alloy with copper and silver inlay, private collection, published by Rossi & Rossi.

Here the book is topped with three pearls.

15th-16th century, Tibet, Sakya Pandita, bronze with copper and silver inlay, private collection, photo by Christie’s.

Another remarkable portrait of the master, with silver-inlaid eyes and urna, copper-inlaid lips, incised hems, his head topped with a chignon like the historical buddha, seated on a double lotus base with thick beading and an inscription on the rim.