Nepal, various female deities (7)

13th c., Nepal, Tara, gilt bronze, 23,6 cm, 16dec15, Arts d'Asie lot 73, Paris Sotheby's

13th century, Nepal, Tara, gilt bronze, private collection, photo on Sotheby’s, Paris

This Newar masterpiece depicts Tara, adorned with a three-leaf crown, large hoops, and princely jewellery, holding a small fruit in her right hand held in the gesture of generosity and the stem of a large lotus (typical of the early Malla period) in the other. 

17th-18th century, Nepal, Tara, gilt wood with bronze hands and feet, 40 cm, 10jun14, Arts d'Asie lot 332, Paris Sotheby's

17th-18th century, Nepal, Tara, wood and bronze, private collection, photo on Sotheby’s, Paris.

A singular combination of wood with copper alloy hands and feet for this Green Tara.

18th c., Nepal, bodhisattva, gilt bronze+red pig., 15,5 cm, varada+vitarka, 10jun16, auction 1072 lot 23, Lempertz

18th century, Nepal, bodhisattva, gilt bronze and red pigment, private collection, photo on Lempertz

18th c., Nepal, bodhisattva, gilt bronze+red pig., 15,5 cm, vitarka+varada, 10jun16, auction 1072 lot 23, Lempertz

18th century, Nepal, bodhisattva, gilt bronze and red pigment, private collection, photo on Lempertz as before.

Designed to be placed on each side of a main deity, these two standing female figures (possibly attendants) hold the same two types of lotuses and make the same gestures but on opposite sides. 

13th-14th c. Nepal, Mahamayuri, gilt+polyc. wood, 40 cm, 16mar21, Indian, Him. lot 311, Bonhams

13th-14th century, Nepal, protector goddess, gilt and polychrome wood, private collection, photo on Bonhams

This angry female with the body of a yaksha has three heads, each with three eyes, and six arms. She sits on a victim and has a snake in her main mouth. Her left hands hold a bowl or pot, a head, a lasso; the right hands hold a sword, a hook (elephant goad) and an indeterminate implement. This combination doesn’t match any standard description of either Mahamayuri, Mahasitavati, or Maha Sahasrapramardini, who may have one head and six arms. However, the five pancha raksha deities, who embody five ancient Buddhist texts of the same name, are depicted in numerous ways – as explained by Edward Wilkinson on the above link.

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