Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, padmapani – seated (3)

7th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, wood, was at the gTsug Lakhang in Lhasa, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

The deity is seated with the right leg pendant, on a lotus base with large petals going upwards, holding the stem of a large lotus in his left hand, the right arm resting over the knee, the hand displaying the gesture of supreme generosity. He wears lotiform earrings, a short necklace and possibly bracelets. The aesthetics correspond to the Nepalese Licchavi period.

10th-11th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, copper alloy with traces of gilding, at the Liverpool Museum (UK).

His right foot resting on a lotus attached to the base (with  2 rows of large round petals more often seen on 16th century works), another lotus to his right, he has an antelope skin over his left shoulder (knotted across his chest), an effigy of Amitabha on his crown, foliate and beaded jewellery, and wears a short dhoti decorated with a stippled floral motif.

13th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, gilt copper with cold gold and pigments, was at the gTsug Lakhang in Lhasa, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

This Pala-style sculpture depicts him with a low crown and tall braided chignon adorned with an image of Amitabha at the front and a flaming jewel finial.

He wears princely jewellery, a thin flowing celestial scarf…

and a lower garment richly decorated with small geometrical figures. There is a small lotus in the palm of his right hand.

15th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, gilt copper alloy, private collection, photo by Tensig Asian Art on tenzigasianart.com.

This image marries the Nepalese Malla style with Tibetan facial features and a Chinese-style cross belt and belt. His dhoti is decorated with a floral pattern across the thighs and a matching flouncy hem.

17th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, copper alloy with cold gold, made by Chôying Dorge, at the State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg (Russia).

Apart from the Swat-Valley style lotus pedestal, everything on this sculpture was created the 10th Karmapa, including the water flowing from the water pot, the latter often included in Gandharan images of this bodhisattva.

He wears a crown made of large floral roundels, a matching finial, large floral hoops, bulky beaded jewellery, a realistic antelope skin over his left shoulder, a long crinkle cloth dhoti. The back panel is decorated with flowers, foliage and two peacock hens.

17th-18th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, gilt copper alloy and pigments, private collection, photo by Koller.

This one holds his right hand in the fear-allaying gesture.

 

 

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