Tibet, Vajradhara alone (6)

14th-15th century, Tibet, Vajradhara, gilt copper alloy and stone inlay, private collection, photo by Sotheby's.

14th-15th century, Tibet, Vajradhara, gilt copper alloy and stone inlay (most of them missing), private collection, photo by Sotheby’s.

Vajradhara is seated on a type of double-lotus base with round petals normally associated with slightly later works. The front panel of his crown consists in a crescent moon and  visvajra design inlaid with gems. It is decorated with bows and long ribbons also inlaid with gems, like all his other accessories, which include a short and a long necklace, armbands, bracelets, anklets and a belt. He wears a striped dhoti reaching calf level, the end folded under his ankles in a small scallop shape. His chignon is topped with a half-vajra finial.

15th-16th century, Tibet, Vajradhara, gilt copper with stone inlay and pigments, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

15th-16th century, Tibet, Vajradhara, gilt copper with stone inlay and pigments, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

This buddha, with the facial features, the same type of accessories, lower garment and lotus base, is likely to have been made at the same time and in the same workshop as the previous one (therefore the dating of one of them is probably wrong). The use of gilt copper, the design of the base, the use of small cabochons including clear gems indicate a Nepalese influence.

16th century, Tibet, Vajradhara, partly re-gilt, stone inlay replaced, private collection, photo by Koller.

16th century, Tibet, Vajradhara, partly re-gilt, stone inlay replaced, private collection, photo by Koller.

Another gilt copper image with fairly similar accessories and striped dhoti, on a slightly lower double-lotus base.

16th-17th century, Tibet, Vajradhara, gilt copper alloy and stones, private collection, photo by Christie's.

16th-17th century, Tibet, Vajradhara, gilt copper alloy and stones, private collection, photo by Christie’s.

On this later work, the style of the crown, jewellery and dhoti are still quite similar whereas the facial features are different, the ribbons of the crown are shorter and the chignon is topped with a conical finial.

 

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