Kashmir, two rare sculptures

10th century, Kashmir or Northern India, Trailokyavijaya, labelled Humkara, brass, cold gold, pigments, is or was at the gTsug Lakhang, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

10th century, Kashmir, Utpala dynasty, unidentified, brass, cold gold, pigments, is or was at the gTsug Lakhang, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

This wrathful deity with three heads and 22 hands stands on a flat lotus over a pedestal supported by three lions, adorned with a foliate garland and princely jewellery, his faces painted with cold gold and pigments, his hair dyed with lapis lazuli powder. The main head is peaceful, the one to his left is wrathful, the other semi-wrathful. On the Himalayan Art Resources website he appears under ‘Humkara’, who normally has one head and two or four hands.

10th-c-kashmir-or-n-india-humkara-gilt-c-a-pig-255-cm-upper-hands-gtsug-lakhang

10th-c-kashmir-or-n-india-humkara-gilt-c-a-pig-255-cm-lower-hands-gtsug-lakhang

The three heads have an effigy of a buddha on a crescent moon and there is another on top of the chignon. The main hands are held in a gesture sometimes referred to as the vajrahumkara mudra although it corresponds in fact to the bhutadamara mudra, associated mainly with a four-arm form of wrathful Vajrapani, but with the foregingers erect, a gesture specific to Humkara. To complicate matters further there is a third mudra also called vajrahumkara mudra but with the palms inwards. The top hands hold, behind the head, a buddha seated on a lotus throne, the other hands hold various attributes which seem to be two discs, a thunderbolt, two knives, a bell, two swords, a manuscript, two nooses, a pot of water , a lotus flower, a rosary, an elephant goad, an axe.

10th-c-kashmir-or-n-india-humkara-gilt-c-a-pig-255-cm-back-gtsug-lakhang

The deity wears an animal skin (probably tiger) around the waist and stands on two victims.

11th century, Kashmir or Western Tibet, Kalachakra and Vishvamata, brass, at the Newark Museum (USA).

11th century, Kashmir or Western Tibet, Kalachakra and Vishvamata, brass, at the Newark Museum (USA).

Kalachakra, with four heads topped with a visvajra (double thunderbolt) and 24 hands in which he holds various implements, embraces his consort, Vishvamata. They normally stand on two victims but on this occasion they are seated on a throne with a serrated halo topped with an upright vajra.

 

3 thoughts on “Kashmir, two rare sculptures

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s