Tibet, standing Maitreya (4)

12th century, Tibet, Maitreya, gilt metal with pigments, is or was at the gTsug Lakhang in Lhasa, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

12th century, Tibet, Maitreya, gilt metal with cold gold and pigments, is or was at the gTsug Lakhang in Lhasa, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

Maitreya, in his bodhisattva form, holds the stem of a flower supporting a pot of water in his left hand (the fingers held in the kartari mudra) and does the gesture of generosity with the other (varada mudra).

12th c., Tibet, Maitreya, gilt metal, 53 cm, blue lotus

There is a triangular flower, possibly a blue lotus, fastened to his right shoulder.

17th century circa, Central Tibet, Maitreya, copper alloy, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

17th century circa, Central Tibet, Maitreya (labelled Manjushri Siddhaikavira), copper alloy, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

On this Pala-revival style work (with clearly different body proportions and a different type of pedestal) he does the same gestures and has the same attributes. His dhoti is decorated with a floral pattern and held in place with a festooned belt adorned with a flower.

16th century, Tibet, Maitreya, gilt metal, at the Rubin Museum of Art (USA).

16th century, Tibet, Maitreya, gilt metal, at the Rubin Museum of Art (USA).

16th c., Tibet, Maitreya, gilt metal, pot of water, Rubin MoA

This richly gilt and gem-inlaid figure is identified as Maitreya thanks to the small pot of water in the vegetation he holds to his right.

18th century (1700-1750), Tibet, Maitreya, bronze, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (USA).

18th century (1700-1750), Tibet, Maitreya, bronze, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (USA).

This one, on the other hand, has an antelope skin on his shoulder and does the vitarka mudra with his right hand. His double chignon is sometimes seen on Mongolian and Chinese sculptures too. The round hips and skirt-like cloth, the belt with pendants,  the flat celestial scarf forming a loop around his elbow and the facial features all indicate a Chinese influence.

 

 

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