Nepal, Late Malla Akshobhya

15th-16th century, Nepal, Akshobhya, mercury-gilt brass, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

15th-16th century, Nepal, Akshobhya, mercury-gilt brass, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Akshobhya, in his bodhisattva appearance, is seated on a single lotus base over a throne supported by two elephants and decorated with an upright vajra at the front.

15th-16th c., Nepal, Akshobhya, mercury gilt brass, 7,6 cm, elephant throne, Philadelphia

There is an incised geometrical pattern below and above the elephants, and a curved incision on the tip of each lotus petal.

15th-16th c., Nepal, Akshobhya, mercury gilt brass, 7,6 cm, upright vajra, Philadelphia

There is an upright vajra in his left hand. He is adorned with a five-leaf crown with large bows and flowing ribbons and bulky jewellery with an unusual design, including large floral earrings and matching armbands.

16th century, Nepal, Akshobhya, gilt copper alloy and stone inlay, at the British Museum (UK).

16th century, Nepal, Akshobhya, gilt copper alloy and stone inlay, at the British Museum (UK).

The Yongle-style lotus base, thick beading and piping on the hem of his sanghati, and the vajra in front of him – studded with a diamond, situate this buddha in the late Malla period although he displays features proper to earlier Nepalese art (in particular from the Khasa Malla region) such as a full face with a turquoise-inlaid urna, the hair dyed with lapis lazuli powder, a rosette above each ear.

Same as before.

Same as before, gilt copper repoussé and pigments, private collection, photo by Sotheby’s.

Adorned with princely jewellery and wearing a long dhoti draped in the Chinese style, this Akshobhya holds an upright vajra with both hands – something that departs from the standard iconography (this position of the hands corresponds to Amitabha/Amitayus who holds a bowl/long-life vase). He has an elongated trunk, a full face, red lips and blue hair, a lobed abdomen and very plump toes.

16th c., Nepal, Akshobhya, gilt cop., 55 cm, holes in arm+chest, Sotheby's

The style of his jewellery is very different from the Early Malla period. The tiny holes on his forearms, chest and head,  suggest that his crown and another accessory, perhaps a celestial scarf, are missing.

16th century, Nepal, Akshobhya, gilt copper alloy, private collection, photo by Koller.

16th century, Nepal, Akshobhya, gilt copper alloy, private collection, photo by Koller.

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