Nepal, early Malla Avalokiteshvara

13th century, Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, gilt copper, private collection, photo by Christie's.

13th century, Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, gilt copper, private collection, photo by Christie’s.

When seated, Avalokiteshvara in his padmapani form may be seated in a relaxed pose, his right hand placed nonchalantly over the raised knee, the left hand resting on the base and holding the long stem of a lotus flower.

13th century, Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, gilt copper and stones, at the Asia Society Museum in New York (USA).

13th century, Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, gilt copper and stone inlay, at the Asia Society Museum in New York (USA).

This sculpture depicts him with one leg on top of the other, a pose specific to the Nepalese Malla period. His left hand almost certainly held the stem of a lotus, now missing, fastened to his left forearm. He wears a five-leaf crown with Kirtimukha at the centre.

13th c., Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, gilt cop.+stones, 47 cm, lost lotus, rings, diamond in palm. antelope skin on shoulder, diamond in palm, Asia Society M. in NY

His right hand displays the abhaya mudra and there is an incised diamond in its palm.

14th century, Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, copper alloy and stone inlay, at the Norton Simon Museum (USA).

14th century, Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, copper alloy and stone inlay, at the Norton Simon Museum (USA).

This un-gilt works looks almost identical, the  waist is straighter and the bows on each side are placed more forward. There is a red cabochon at the centre of his belt.

14th c., Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, c.a.+ stones, 45 cm, missing lotus, diamond+lotus in palm, NSM

and a lotus inside a rhombus/diamond in the palm of his right hand.

These two items may, in fact, be contemporary.

15th century, Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, copper or copper alloy, at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts (USA).

15th century, Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, copper or copper alloy, at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts (USA).

This Pala-style Padmapani has a lotus flower embossed in the palm of his right hand, extended in the varada mudra. He is seated on a tall pedestal with two rows of petals, his right foot resting on a flower attached to the base. The long stem of a (broken) lotus passes through his left hand.

 

 

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