Padmapani, early Malla period (3)

13th century, Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, gilt copper alloy, private collection, photo by Christie's.

13th century, Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, gilt copper alloy and gemstones, private collection, photo by Christie’s.

This is a standard image of the bodhisattva holding the (broken) stem of a lotus in his left hand and doing the varada mudra with the other.

13th c., Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, gilt c.a., 45,4 cm, stippled incised dhoti, foliate tiara, close up, Christie's

He wears princely jewellery inlaid with clear gems, large hoops, a sacred thread, a three-leaf crown with a tall central panel, small bows and flowing ribbons. There is an unusual urna on his forehead, shaped more like a third eye. His gaze is reminiscent of Indian Pala works.

13th c., Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, gilt c.a., 45,4 cm, stippled incised dhoti, foliate tiara, diamond+lotus in palm, Christie's

There is a lotus flower within a diamond in the palm of his hand. His dhoti is incised with a stippled motif and held in place with a belt and a sash.

Same as before.

Same as before.

But for the left arm which is in a different position, this statue is very similar to one at the Cleveland Museum of Art, published in a previous post.

13th c., Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, gilt c.a., 63,4 cm, beaded belt with pendant ribbon, buddha on crown, diamond in palm, Christie's

His dhoti is held in place with a stone-inlaid belt, complete with pleated pendant ribbon, and a sash knotted low down on one side, almost at knee level. There is an incised diamond in the palm of his hand.

13th c., Nepal, Avalokiteshvara, gilt c.a., 63,4 cm, beaded belt with pendant ribbon, buddha on crown, head, Christie's

He has harmonious Nepalese-style facial features with semi-closed eyes and a tear-shaped urna incised on his forehead. There is an effigy of Amitabha in his crown. His tall chignon is topped with a lotus supporting a flaming jewel. The three strands of hair on each side of his head form thick curls over his shoulders.

Same as before

Same as before, at the National Gallery of Australia.

On occasions he does the vitarka mudra with both hands, as on the above sculpture – from which the lotus is missing and which displays a sash knotted on the right side of the bodhisattva instead of the left.

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