Nepal, Amoghapasha Lokeshvara (3)

Undated, 14th century?, Amoghapasha Lokeshvara, gilt copper or copper alloy, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

Undated, 14th century circa?, Amoghapasha Lokeshvara, gilt copper or copper alloy, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

On this version of his one-head and eight-hand form, the deity holds a manuscript, a trident, a vajra and a water pot in his left hands. There is a rosary and a noose (pasha) in his upper right hands, the remaining two do the abhaya and the varada mudra. He wears a five-leaf crown, bodhisattva jewellery, a long dhoti pleated at the front and a broad sash placed low down.

Same as before.

Same as before.

The absence of profuse gilding and stone inlay also situates this sculpture towards the 14th century. There is a manuscript, a trident, possibly a lotus, and a vajra in his left hands, same as before with the right hands. The dhoti is abundantly pleated on the sides and at the front, with the lower extremities forming three sharp points at ankle level.

15th century, Nepal, Amoghapasha Lokeshvara, gilt copper alloy and stones, private collection, photo by Koller.

15th century, Nepal, Amoghapasha Lokeshvara, gilt copper alloy and gemstones, private collection, photo by Koller.

This gilt and stone-inlaid work portrays him with his head slightly tilted, his hair pulled into a tall chignon topped with a finial, wearing a dhoti with a stone-inlaid hem, probably holding the same (missing) attributes on the right. His top left hand holds a manuscript, the lower ones hold a bow and a pot of water. In his eight-hand form Amoghapasha Lokeshvara usually holds a tridandi ( a trident made of three lotus stalks) in his left hand. It is therefore likely to be the missing object on that side.

15th century circa, Nepal, Amoghapasha Lokeshvara, gilt copper alloy and stones, published on pindoles.com

15th century circa, Nepal, Amoghapasha Lokeshvara, gilt copper alloy and stones, published on pindoles.com.

This is the one-head and six-hand form, with a manuscript, possibly a vajra, a pot of water in his left hands, a noose and a (missing) rosary in his right hands, the lower one extended in the varada mudra.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s