Nepal, Thakuri period – Tara (1)

10th century, Nepal, Tara, gilt copper, is or was at the gTsug Lakhang, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

10th century, Nepal, Tara, gilt copper, is or was at the gTsug Lakhang, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

White Tara stands on a double-lotus base with a plain upper part and a larger lower part with a row broad petals derived from the Licchavi-style pedestal, with a tall lotus flower attached to it, the stem passing through her left hand. She wears a three-leaf crown, the front panel bigger than the other two, a serrated flaming halo is attached to her back.

10th century, Nepal, Tara and attendants, gilt copper alloy with gems and pigments, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (USA).

10th century, Nepal, Tara and attendants, gilt copper alloy with gems and pigments, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (USA).

Green Tara is seated on a large lotus flower, a leg unfolded, the foot resting on a bud. She is doing the dharmacakra mudra (turning the wheel of dharma) with her hands. Her hair is loosely piled and topped with an adornment. She wears a long dhoti with decorated with an incised motif. The figure to her left holds an upright vajra and a pot of water.

11th century circa, Nepal, Tara, copper with traces of gilding and pigments, is or was at the gTsug Lakhang, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

11th century circa, Nepal, Tara, copper with traces of gilding and pigments, is or was at the gTsug Lakhang, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

This Green Tara wears a very ornate crown with a Kirtimukha design on the front panel and fan-shaped side bows, She is adorned with floral earrings and a necklace with a floral pendant, foliate armbands, delicate beaded bracelets and anklets. Her long lower garment is partly decorated with an incised pattern and held in place with a belt. Once in Tibet, the face has been painted with cold gold and pigments and the hair dyed with lapis lazuli powder.

Same as before, transitional period.

Same as before.

This sculpture of a similar style depicts White Tara holding the (broken) stem of a tall lotus that springs from the pedestal.  At the same time, her left hand does the kartari mudra but with the middle finger slightly bent. She does the varada mudra with her right hand as a sign of supreme generosity. Her long garment, billowing to one side,  is decorated with incised rosettes and four-petal flowers that resemble the double thunderbolt (visvajra). Her crown (with a Kirtimukha design at the front), jewellery and buckle are inlaid with gemstones.

11th century, Nepal, Tara, copper, at the Canada

11th century, Nepal, Tara, copper (or copper alloy?), at a Canadian museum or gallery.

On this sculpture the lotus is also broken and only part of the stem remains in her left hand, which does the kartari mudra.  There is a raised flower in the palm of her right hand.

Same as before, gilt copper with stones, at the Walters Museum of Art (USA).

11th century, Nepal, Tara, gilt copper inlaid with stones (missing), at the Walters Art Museum (USA).

Her right hand raised in the fear-allaying gesture, the other holding a lotus flower, Green Tara is seated on a double-lotus base partly covered by layers of cloth from her lower garment. Her thin hips are enhanced by a belt, once inlaid with large cabochons, like her jewellery and crown.

11th century circa, Nepal, Tara, copper with gilding, at the Fondation Alain Bordier (Switzerland).

11th century circa, Nepal, Tara, copper with gilding, at the Fondation Alain Bordier (Switzerland).

It is worth noting that none of these standing figures have a sash across the hips/thighs.

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