Tibet, Avalokiteshvara – standing (2)

11th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara Padmapani, copper alloy, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

11th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara Padmapani, copper alloy, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

Avalokiteshvara is identified through the effigy of Amitabha on the front panel of his (partly broken) crown, he holds the stem of a lotus flower in his right hand (a four-petal design that matches his earrings) and does the varada mudra (gesture of generosity) with the other.  Long strands of hair fall over his shoulders. He wears a knee-length dhoti, and is adorned with a short necklace and a longer one worn across the chest like a sacred thread. His oversized arms seem to accentuate his generous nature.

11th-12th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshavara Padmapani, gilt copper, is or was in Lhasa, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

11th-12th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshavara Padmapani, gilt copper, is or was in Lhasa, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

This example has an elaborate three-leaf crown with matching jewellery, including an adornment on one shin that matches his foliate armbands.  A small antelope skin covers his left shoulders. His left hand, in kartari mudra (gesture of discord) holds the stem of an eight-petal lotus flower, his right hand is held down, palm out, in varada mudra (generosity). The thin stems of the plants on each side of him are secured with rods. The artist has successfully combined Indian elements (such as the gaze, the punched navel, the large bows of the crown, the way his garland imitates festooned belts) with Nepalese traits (such as the use of copper, gilding and stone inlay) and West Tibetan features (prominent knee caps over rigid legs, a knee-length dhoti shorter on one side) which make this piece unique.

11th century, same as before.

11th century, same as before.

This is a Nepalese Takuri-style body (except for the rigidity of the legs and thickness of the ankles) with a large Tibetan-style head (with generous facial features,  painted with cold gold and pigments). a very large lotus flower is attached to his forearm, the (broken) stem passes through his left hand. The right hand is decorated with an incised pattern. The pointed ends of his fingers seem to be matching the sharp end of his lower garment at the front.

11th century, same as before.

11th century, same as before.

 

This is a very similar sculpture but the artist has chosen to depict him with his eyes half closed, giving him a more spiritual gaze.

 

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