Tibet, peaceful Manjushri

13th-14th century, Tibet, Manjushri, gilt copper, at the San Diego Museum of Art (USA).

13th-14th century, Tibet, Manjushri, gilt copper, at the San Diego Museum of Art (USA).

From the 13th century onwards, the white form of Manjushri may hold a lotus from which part of a sword comes out, and another supporting a manuscript to his left. The above wears a tall Kashmiri-style crown, princely jewellery, a matching belt and something thicker than a sacred thread but smoother than the garland of flowers we often see on West Tibetan works.

14th century, Tibet, Manjushri, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

14th century, Tibet, Manjushri, gilt metal, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

This Manjushri sits with a leg pendant, his foot resting on a large lotus flower, displaying a sole incised with a flower, his hands doing the dharmacakra mudra and holding the stem of two lotuses supporting a (broken) sword to his right and a book to his left, adorned with princely jewellery, a sacred thread, and wearing a long lower garment decorated with double thunderbolts (visvajra) inlaid with (missing) stones in the style of the Densatil monastery. The double-lotus base is placed on a throne supported by snow lions and decorated with lotuses. He has a smiling face with semi-closed eyes and a rectangular urna.

15th-16th century, Tibet or Nepal, Manjushri, gilt metal, at the Tibet Museum in Lhasa.

15th-16th century, Tibet or Nepal, Manjushri, gilt metal, at the Tibet Museum in Lhasa.

Peaceful Manjushri occasionally has a half-vajra finial on his head.

15th-16th century, Tibet, Manjushri, gilt copper alloy with silver and stone inlay, private collection, photo by Bonhams.

15th-16th century, Tibet, Manjushri, gilt copper alloy with silver and stone inlay, private collection, photo by Bonhams.

This Nepalese-style work is heavily inlaid with stones including turquoise, lapis lazuli, carnelian. The shape of the petals on the lotus base is typical of Nepalese-style works made in Tibet during the 15th-16th century.

 

16th century circa, Tibet, Manjushri, gilt copper with cold gold and pigments, is or was at the Jokhang in Lhasa, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

16th century circa, Tibet, Manjushri, gilt copper with cold gold and pigments, is or was at the Jokhang/gTusg Lakhang in Lhasa, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

Despite the missing attributes, this sculpture is thought to be depicting Manjushri, a lotus attached to his left elbow, his hands doing the dharmacakra mudra, his chignon topped with a small buddha finial.

16th century, Eastern Tibet, Manjushri, gilt copper alloy with pigments and stone and pearl inlay, 25,5 cm, private collection

16th century, Eastern Tibet, Manjushri, gilt copper alloy with pigments and stone and pearl inlay, 25,5 cm, private collection, photo by Mossgreen.

On this masterpiece, the lotus to his left supports a book topped with a flaming pearl or jewels, a flaming sword is sprouting from the other and his chignon is topped with a flaming pearl. His five-leaf crown and jewellery are inlaid with turquoise, lapis lazuli and coral. His softly draped lower garment is adorned with a Chinese-style belt typical of Eastern Tibet consisting in long beaded loops and strands of beads that go down to his knees.

16th c., Tibet, Maitreya, gilt c.a., curl of hair on forehead

Same as before, photo by Skinner.

There is a hair curl (urna) on his forehead.

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