Western Tibet, White Manjushri – standing

11th century circa, Western Tibet, copper alloy with cold gold and pigments, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

11th century circa, Western Tibet, copper alloy with cold gold and pigments, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

In sculpture, White Manjushri refers to the peaceful form of Manjushri without a sword. When standing, his right hand does the abhaya mudra, or the varada mudra as above. There is a lotus flower in the palm of his right hand, the left hand holds the long stem of a lotus supporting a book/manuscript. He wears a richly incised dhoti, longer on one side, and a garland of flowers typical of Western Tibet, a tall Kashmiri-style crown, princely jewellery, a beaded belt and a sacred thread. Manjushri often has long strands of plaited hair over his shoulders.

Same as before.

Same as before.

This bodhisattva has lost his crown and attributes but the position of the hands correspond to White Manjushri.

12th century circa, Tibet, copper alloy, private collection, photo by Sotheby's.

12th century circa, Western Tibet, copper alloy, private collection, photo by Sotheby’s.

This masterpiece, probably from the Guge kindom, depicts him with a sash across his chest and a tall blue lotus (utpala) flower attached to the base. His eyes and urna are inlaid with silver. Like the other two works above, he has a Kashmiri-style cruciform navel.

Same as before, photo by Christie's.

Same as before, Manjushri with attendants, photo by Christie’s.

 

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