Tibet, peaceful Manjushri – seated (4)

10th-11th century, Tibet, Manjushri, copper alloy, private collection, photo by Nagel.

10th-11th century, Tibet, Manjushri, copper alloy, private collection, photo by Nagel.

This Nepalese-style sculpture, complete with throne and back panel, depicts the white form (without a sword) of Manjushri seated in the vajra position with both hands in the dhyana (meditation) mudra, his eyes semi-closed, adorned with bodhisattva jewellery including his typical three-toothed necklace, a mitre-like crown typical of the Thakuri period. At the top of the panel we can see a garuda (khyung in Tibetan).

10th-11th c., Tibet, Manjushri, c.a., throne 15th-16th c., back

A tightly wrapped sash goes across his chest and back, its straight edges resting over his right shoulder. This garment, particularly popular in Nepal and normally worn across the hips, is not to be confused with the flowing celestial scarf that often adorns a bodhisattvas neck, shoulders and arms.

12th century, Tibet, Manjushri, copper alloy, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

12th century, Tibet, Manjushri, copper alloy, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

This work is labelled ‘Avalokiteshvara’ but the manuscript and the blue lotus that supports it are  attributes related to Manjushri. His sits on a double-lotus base with wide petals supported by a Kashmiri-style plinths, his right foot resting on a lotus flower attached to it. The flower on the central panel of his crown and on his jewellery point to a West Tibetan artist. Manjushri often has long strands of plaited hair falling to over his shoulders.

13th-14th century, Tibet, Manjushri, copper alloy with turquoise inlay, private collection, published on  www.asianart.com

13th-14th century, Tibet, Manjushri, copper alloy with turquoise inlay, private collection, published on http://www.asianart.com

Possibly made by an Indian artist in Tibet, this Pala-style masterpiece shows Manjushri surrounded with a blue lotus to his right and a large lotus supporting a manuscript to his left. His tall chignon is topped with a finial that matches the front panel of his low tiara. His sash and ankle-length dhoti are decorated with a stippled motif and there is a flower incised in the palm of his right hand.

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