Tibet, Yellow Jambhala (7)

15th-16th century, Tibet, Yellow Jambhala, dark copper alloy, private collection, photo by Nagel.

15th-16th century, Tibet, Yellow Jambhala, copper alloy, private collection, photo by Nagel.

This is a most unusual sculpture of Yellow Jambhala standing on a single-lotus pedestal over a rectangular throne supported by long-life vases, his mongoose spewing a long string of jewels.  He has a Nepalese-style oval face with a tall rectangular urna, a low crown inlaid with (now missing) gemstones, two beaded necklaces and matching bracelets and anklets, some armbands and large earrings.

15th-16th c., Tibet, Jambhala, c.a., rectangular throne, mongoose, fruit, vase

His right arm supports a long-life vase, his right hand holds an egg-shaped citrus fruit.

Undated (15th-16th century?), Tibet, Yellow Jambhala, copper alloy, at the Pacific Asia Museum.

Undated (15th-16th century?), Tibet, Yellow Jambhala, gilt copper alloy with stone and glass inlay, at the Pacific Asia Museum.

This is an other sculpture with a single-lotus base over a throne supported by long-life vases, but this time he is seated, as is normally the case, his right foot resting on a vase. He is adorned with a small five-leaf crown inlaid with glass and coral, some jewellery and a garland. His right hand does the tarjani mudra.

15th-16th c?, Tibet prob., Jambhala, gilt c.a.+glass+coral, close up

He has a squarish face with thin eyebrows and no urna. His crown is adorned with bows and ribbons linked to the five crown panels with a thin metal bar to prevent breakage.

15th-16th c?, Tibet prob., Jambhala, gilt c.a.+glass+coral, back

The lotus design goes all around the base.

15th century, Tibet, Yellow Jambhala, copper alloy with traces of cold gold, at the Pacific Asia Museum.

15th century, Tibet, Yellow Jambhala, copper alloy with traces of cold gold and turquoise inlay, at the Pacific Asia Museum.

This more archaic version has him seated on a throne supported by long-life vases and upright vajras (diamond thunderbolts). He holds the three jewels or triratna (norbu in Tibetan) in his right hand instead of his usual ovoid citrus fruit.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s