Tibet, Black Jambhala (3)

 

16th century, Tibet, Black Jambhala, copper alloy, at the Rubin Museum of Art (USA).

16th century, Tibet, Black Jambhala, copper alloy, at the Rubin Museum of Art (USA).

Black Jambhala has one head, with bare fangs, 2 legs that stand on a victim (not visible here) and 2 hands that hold a mongoose spewing jewels and a skull cup. He wears a tiger skin dhoti and is adorned with snake jewellery and sacred cord. His flaming hair is painted with red pigment, tied with a snake and topped with a buddha. The arch around him is painted with various symbols, including a crescent moon and sun disc on each side.

B-16th c., Tibet, Black Jambhala, bronze, 51 cm, close up

His facial hair is also painted red. He has no third eye and no earrings.

Same as before, gilt copper alloy, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

Same as before, gilt copper alloy, private collection, published on Himalayan Art Resources.

On this Nepalese-style example, he wears a crown,  adorned with bows and turquoise-inlaid rosettes, and some stone-inlaid jewellery. He stands on the gold of wealth.

Undated, Tibet, Black Jambhala, gilt copper alloy, at the Rubin Museum of Art.

Undated, Tibet, Black Jambhala, gilt copper alloy, at the Rubin Museum of Art.

His skull cup is filled with jewels (Jambhala is associated with wealth). It is very difficult to date a piece which has lost is base. The sobriety of this sculpture and the way his flaming hair is shaped correspond to early works (13th and 14th century), but the use of gilding points to the 15th century circa.

18th century, Tibet, same as before.

18th century, Tibet, same as before.

This Chinese-style masterpiece depicts him with the face of a wild beast. There are ‘modern’ elements such as the celestial scarf behind his shoulders…

B-18th c., Tibet, Black Jambhala, bronze, close up

beaded jewellery instead of snakes, his bracelet adorned with a large flower, his hair style, the individually sculpted locks on his beard, the single-lotus base with flat pointed petals going downwards, etc.

 

 

 

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