Himachal Pradesh, a Tara shrine

10th-11th century, Himachal Pradesh, Tara, wood, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (USA).

10th-11th century, Himachal Pradesh, Tara, part of a wooden shrine, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (USA).

This image depicts Tara standing on a single-lotus base on a throne supported by three yakshas. She is clad in a tight-fitting bodice and a short lower garment held in place with a beaded belt decorated with a lotus flower. There is a long garland passing over her legs, a long-stemmed lotus flower to her left, part of a flat, wavy celestial scarf typical of the area, to her right.  The small figure at her feet is probably a donor. On each side of her, there are various scenes thought to represent perils such as fire or the trampling of wild elephants, given that this aspect of the deity is believed to protect against them. Above her, entwined lotus flowers forming an arch, topped with two triangular shapes, with carvings of birds on the sides, complete the scene.

10th-11th c., Himachal Pradesh, Tara, wood, close up

Although the image is badly worn we can see her large earrings, the two different ear ornaments typical of Norther India, her three-leaf crown (broken at the front) decorated with rosettes (lotus flowers), which are very similar to those of a 10th-11th century Himachal Pradesh Kurukulla metal sculpture published in a previous post (see close up below).

10th-11th c., Himachal Pradesh, Kurukulla, earrings

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s