Swat Valley pedestals

Perhaps the most common Swat Valley sculptures pedestal is the hourglass-shaped double-lotus base with petals that recall the leaves of an artichoke, without a plinth underneath (unlike Kashmiri works).

9th century, Swat Valley, Maitreya, brass, at the Beijing Museum.

9th century, Swat Valley, Maitreya, brass, at the Beijing Museum.

Sometimes the double-lotus rests on a flat piece of metal, as above.

8th-10th centur, Swat Valley, Maitreya, copper alloy, at the Rijksmuseum.

8th-10th century, Swat Valley, Maitreya, copper alloy, at the Rijksmuseum (the Netherlands).

Occasionally, the figures sits on a single-lotus base, like this Maitreya, who holds a pot of water in his left hand and who has his hair tied in a fan shape, in the Swat Valley fashion.

8th century, Swat Valley, Vajrapani, copper alloy, at the Crocker Art Museum (USA).

8th century, Swat Valley, Vajrapani, copper alloy, at the Crocker Art Museum (USA).

Another distinctive Swat Valley feature is the lion-throne on a lotus base, with tassels at each corner and at the front, similar to the Gilgit lion-throne pedestal but not necessarily with a plinth or a rocky formation below.

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