Nepal, Amoghapasha Lokeshvara

Particularly worshipped in Nepal, Amoghapasha, “the unfailing lasso”, may have one to four faces, with 2 to 12 arms. His rope/noose may be extended in the form of a lasso or bound and coiled or sheathed. In Nepal, he may have a tiger skin dhoti and his attributes vary slightly from those seen on Tibetan sculptures.

14th century, Nepal, Amoghapasha, gilt copper alloy, photo by Kapoor gallery.

14th century, Nepal, Amoghapasha, gilt copper alloy, photo by Kapoor gallery.

When depicted with eight hands, one of his left hands normally holds a trident, missing on this example His other left hands hold a water pot, a lotus flower, a book/manuscript. Two of his right hands do the fear-allaying and the generosity gestures, the others hold a folded noose and a (missing) rosary. His short dhoti is incised with a floral motif throughout. His belt, crown, sacred cord and jewellery are inlaid with clear gemstones and turquoise. His Indian-style chignon is topped with a jewel. His sash falls low down in a circular shape, below the sacred cord. He has realistic  knee caps and nipples but rather square feet with short thin toes. The urna on his forehead is rectangular, in the Nepalese fashion. The legs are rigid but the thin waist slants slightly to one side.

Same, gilt copper, photo by Christie's.

Same, gilt copper, photo by Christie’s.

This sculpture shows him with elegant body proportions and a more accentuated slant that will be the mark of the Malla period.

14th-15th century, Nepal, gilt metal, at the Cleveland Museum of Art (USA),

14th-15th century, Nepal, gilt metal, at the Cleveland Museum of Art (USA),

Here, we can see the trident in one of his right hands, the lower one does the gesture of generosity, the upper one holds the noose. His left hands hold a lotus flower, a water pot and a manuscript.

15th century, Nepal, Amoghagpasha, published on pundoles.com

15th century, Nepal, Amoghagpasha, published on pundoles.com

This primitive-looking statue depicts him with a tiger skin tied around his waist, the legs of the animal hanging at the front. Two of his right hands do the generosity and the fear-allaying gesture, the other two hold a noose and a rosary. His left hand hold a water pot, a lotus flower, a trident and a manuscript. He has no jewellery, only a sacred cord. There is an antelope skin over his left shoulder. His hair is tied into a tall Indian-style chignon, except for some long strands that fall on his shoulders.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s