Nepal, Manjushri – transitional period

10th century, Nepal, Manjushri, copper with cold gold and pigment, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

10th century, Nepal, Manjushri, copper with cold gold and pigments, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

Manjushri, the bodhisattva of wisdom, is depicted in his peaceful form. He holds a long-stem lotus (now missing) in his left hand and a pearl in his right hand (possibly specific to Nepal), which is doing the gesture of generosity. His hair is tied into a chignon, with long strands falling onto his shoulders. He is adorned with bodhisattva jewellery including a lotus design, and wears an incised dhoti that is longer one one side, held in place with a belt. The shape of the halo attached to his shoulders, the sturdiness of his legs and the treatment of the garments are typical of the transition between the Licchavi and the Thakuri period. The statue was worshipped in Tibet, hence the cold gold and pigments on his face and the lapis lazuli powder on his hair. His very large head indicates that he may have been made in the Lhasa region, by a Nepalese artist.

10th-11th century, Nepal, same as before.

10th-11th century, Nepal, same as before.

This one stands on a double-lotus base typical of the late Licchavi period, however, the sturdiness of his body is far-removed from the graceful Licchavi standards, as is the bulky jewellery. There is an effigy of Amitabha on his head. He wears a sacred thread across his chest, fastened by the sash across his hips. (As we have seen in a separate post, the broad sash knotted on one side is a constant feature of Nepalese sculptures throughout the centuries).

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s