Tibet, Milarepa – variants

15th-16th century, Tibet, Milarepa, copper alloy, from the Halpert Collection.

15th-16th century, Tibet, Milarepa, copper alloy, private collection.

The Tibetan poet and saint is holding a hand to his ear as usual, but the  other hand is extended out instead of holding a bowl, and he is adorned with armbands and bracelets. We will notice his richly incised gown, the generous draping and the delicate way his hair curls have been rendered.

15th-16th century, Tibet, Milarepa, at the Newark Museum (USA).

15th-16th century, Tibet, Milarepa, at the Newark Museum (USA).

He is not often portrayed with a foot resting on a lotus attached to the base.

15th century circa, Tibet, copper alloy, photo by Christie's.

15th century circa, Tibet, copper alloy, photo by Christie’s.

Occasionally, he sits on a thick cushion without a lotus base below.

16th century, Tibet, gilt copper alloy

16th century, Tibet, gilt copper alloy, photo by Koller.

This sculpture depicts him with a long-life vase instead of a bowl in his left hand.

16th-17th century, Central Tibet, copper, cold gold and pigment, private collection.

16th-17th century, Central Tibet, copper, cold gold and pigment, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (USA).

Milarepa is portrayed here with an attendant kneeling before him, a deer to his left and a dog to his right, in allusion to a legend (according to which a deer, that had sought refuge in the cave where he was meditating, and the hunter’s dog that was chasing it, ended up sitting calmly next to him).

 

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