Tibet, Akshobhya – crowned buddha appearance

16th century, Tibet, Akshobhya, gilt copper alloy, at Musée Guimet (Paris).

16th century, Tibet, Akshobhya, gilt copper alloy, at Musée Guimet (Paris).

Akshobhya may have the appearance of a crowned buddha similar to the historical buddha, from whom he cannot, at times, be distinguished (as discussed in the previous post).

14th century, Tibet, Akshobhya, gilt copper alloy, photo by Mossgreen.

14th century, Tibet, Akshobhya, gilt copper alloy inlaid with stones, photo by Mossgreen.

This Nepalese-style sculpture shows him wearing a plain robe with a beaded hem and a low crown with bows. There is a small vajra, his distinctive attribute, placed in front of him.

16th century, Tibet, Akshobhya, gilt copper with cold gold and pigment, photo by Ulrich von Schroeder.

16th century, Tibet, Akshobhya, gilt copper with cold gold and pigment, photo by Ulrich von Schroeder.

15th-16th century, Tibet, Akshobhya, gilt copper alloy, photo by Christie's.

15th-16th century, Tibet, Akshobhya, gilt copper alloy, photo by Christie’s.

He may be wearing a patched robe and have a more elaborate crown with stone-inlaid rosettes and ribbons.

Early 16th century, Tibet, Akshobhya, gilt copper alloy

Early 16th century, Tibet, Akshobhya, gilt copper alloy.

The plain or patched robe occasionally turns into a richly incised one. It is worth noting that most of the sculptures that depict him as a crowned buddha are fairly late and correspond to the Nepalese style.

 

 

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