Tibet, Padmapani

The term padmapani can be used as an epithet referring to any lotus bearer (or lotus holder). Since  Avalokiteshvara doesn’t normally have an antelope skin over his left shoulder when depicted in his Padmapani  form, it is not always possible to identify him with certainty if there isn’t an effigy of Amitabha in his headdress, on top of his head or on his crown.

12th century circa, Tibet, padmapani, gilt copper alloy, photo by Bonhams.

12th century circa, Tibet, Padmapani, gilt copper alloy, photo by Bonhams.

However, The absence of attributes specific to other bodhisattvas and the position of the hands together with the long-stem lotus on his left generally point to Avalokiteshvara.

12th-13th century, Tibet, copper alloy with pigments, at the gTsug Lakhang in Lhasa, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

12th-13th century, Tibet, copper alloy with pigments, at the gTsug Lakhang in Lhasa, photo by Ulrich von Schroeder.

13th century circa, same as above.

13th century circa, same as above.

13th century circa, Tibet, padmapani, brass with cold gold, photo by Koller.

13th century circa, Tibet, padmapani, brass with cold gold, photo by Koller.

 

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