Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, padmapani – standing

This form of Avalokiteshvara has one head and two (sometimes four) arms. He stands with his right arm held down, palm out, his left hand holds a long-stem lotus while doing the teaching gesture at heart level. He is dressed in bodhisattva attire but doesn’t always wear the antelope skin common to Avalokiteshvara and Maitreya.

12th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, copper alloy, private collection on Himalayan Art Resources.

12th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, copper alloy, private collection on Himalayan Art Resources.

He may stand on a single lotus base…

12th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, at the Tibet Museum in New Delhi.

12th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, brass and cold gold, at the Tibet Museum in New Delhi.

or on a double one. In both cases above, there is a small effigy of buddha Amitabha in his crown, which identifies him as Avalokiteshvara.

12th-13th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, brass, at the Jokhang in Lhasa, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

12th-13th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, brass, formerly at the Jokhang in Lhasa, now in a private collection, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

He may have another long-stem lotus to his right side.

12th century circa, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, gilt copper, at the Sera monastery, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

12th century circa, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, gilt copper, published by Ulrich von Schroeder.

This Nepalese-style Padmapani has lost his lotus but can be easily identified through the effigy of Amitabha on the front panel of his crown.

16th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, copper alloy,

16th century, Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, copper alloy, private collection.

And this one has a large Amitabha on top of his head.

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Tibet, Avalokiteshvara, padmapani – standing

  1. Dear editor,
    I am an avid reader of your excellent website and of your follow up updatings and really find it a precious tool for Himalayan art lovers.
    I am afraid, however, that the location of pieces as identified by Ulrich Von Schroeder in his books and pictures which have gradually surfaced over the years is frequently no longer correct ,as it does not reflect developments of the last 18/ 20 years: as Ulrich well knows, both the Jokhang and the g Tsuk Lakhang in Lhasa were used for long in the past , in particular at more troubled times of the recent Tibetan history , as safer places for religious icons being properties of Tibetan families . A lot of these statues were later withdrawn , and part of them sold .
    The pictures taken by Ulrich which you have published must date back to a time being no later than the mid90s and, as I explained, comments as to the location of pieces , reflect this.
    The “Tibet Avalokiteshvara Padmapani “ in this email (third from the top ) , and another piece you published recently(jan 8th 2015) ( ie Tibet , Maitreya , 4th piece from the top ,11th century circa, western Tibet ) have been in my collection for 17/18 years after I bought them in Europe at that time. One more of the pieces you published (Ancient kingdom of Gilgit , 3rd piece from the top) is also part of my collection .
    I would therefore kindly ask you to amend the description of the two Tibetan pieces described above, and make reference , as to their location, to “private collection” , or, if you think this might be more correct, amend as follows “originally deposited at …….., now in private collection” .
    I would also kindly ask you what could the preferred route to contribute to your databank pictures and details of additional pieces in my collection.
    Kindest regards
    Enrico

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s