From India to Tibet via Nepal

9th century, Eastern India, bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara, copper, cold gold on face, private collection.

9th century (Pala period), Eastern India, bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara, copper, cold gold on face, private collection.

Avalokiteshvara is identified through the effigy of Amitabha in his headdress and the long-stem lotus in his left hand. His ankle-length dhoti is held in place with a belt. He wears a simple necklace, armbands and bracelets and a wide sash across his chest. The crown with very low panels and the tall chignon are typical of Pala India.

11th-12th century (Thakuri period), Nepal, bodhisattva Manjushri, copper alloy with cold gold on the face, published by Carlton Rochelle.

11th-12th century (Thakuri period), Nepal, bodhisattva Manjushri, copper alloy with cold gold on the face, published by Carlton Rochell.

Manjushri holds a manuscript in his left hand while making a symbolical gesture with the other. His dress and jewellery are quite similar to the previous statue but the crown made of three tall triangular panels is typical of the Nepalese Thakuri period.

13th century circa, Tibet, buddha Amitabha, copper alloy with traces of gilding, published by Rossi & Rossi.

13th century circa, Tibet, buddha Amitabha, copper alloy with traces of gilding, published by Rossi & Rossi.

Amitabha would normally have a begging bowl in his cupped hand. The very slender waist,  punched navel and this type of crown are common features of Thakuri sculptures which originated in Pala India and made their way to Tibet via the artists of Nepal.

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