Western Tibet, Avalokiteshvara – standing

10th-11th century, Western Tibet or ancient Tibetan kingdom of Ladakh, bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara Padmapani, brass with silver inlay, at Musée Guimet (Paris)

10th-11th century, Western Tibet or ancient Tibetan kingdom of Ladakh, bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara Padmapani, brass with silver inlay, at Musée Guimet (Paris).

This is one of a series of  10th-11th century statues of Avalokiteshvara Padmapani from Western Tibet or Ladakh made in the Kashmiri style (pointed nose, silver-inlaid eyes and urna, portion of combed hair showing below the crown, developed torso, cruciform navel, realistic body proportions, left leg and torso at a slight slant, zigzag edge and pointed end of the  loincloth, thick garland around him etc. ) but more often than not the marked knee caps are  seen on statues from Ladakh, and the broad face with generous lips is proper to the Tibetan style. Avalokiteshvara Padmapani is wearing a singular crown with buddha Amitabha in the centre. The antelope skin on his back  is knotted at the front, the head and hooves of the animal are well defined. He is holding a long-stemmed lotus in his left hand, the large  flower has  8 flat almond-shape petals (and sepals) around a small raised centre. He has the usual rosettes, jewellery and hairstyle common to Kashmir, Ladakh and Western Tibet. His loincloth, or dhoti, is richly incised and longer on one side, something  common to most West Tibetan bodhisattva sculptures of that period.

10th-11th century, Western Tibet, brass with silver, gold and turquoise inlay, at the Cleveland Museum of Art

10th-11th century, Western Tibet, brass with silver, gold and turquoise inlay, at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Here Padmapani is wearing a thick garland of flowers proper to the Guge Kingdom in Western Tibet. His richly incised dhoti is much longer on one side. His earrings are inlaid with turquoise. Part of his crown is missing and he has no antelope skin knotted at the front but he has a V-shaped sacred thread  on his chest and he is holding two long-stemmed lotuses with ornate foliage. The flowers are broken.

10th-11th century, Western Tibet, bronze with silver inlay, private collection

10th-11th century, Western Tibet, bronze with silver inlay, private collection

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